Made this yesterday: http://beyondkimchee.blogspot.com/2011/11/gogalbi-not-your-ordinary-galbi.html

I had to use tilapia instead of mackarel due to the lack of fish options here, but this was still extremely delicious. I did not get the sauce to set quite as nicely on the fish as Ms. Beyond Kimchee did, hers looks like the sauce formed a beautiful crust on the fish, whereas mine just looked like I slathered sauce on it. STILL, it was a ridiculously easy and delicious fish.

I served it with a provincial (homestyle? Un-fancy? Haphazardly concocted?) Chinese cabbage dish. And rice of course.

A Chinese Cabbage Side Dish
Author: 
Recipe type: Side
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
A fast, easy homestyle side for Chinese dinners.
Ingredients
  • 1 small head of Napa cabbage, sliced from root to top into ⅓ inch wide pieces
  • 1 tbsp chili garlic sauce
  • 1 chicken bouillon cube
  • 1 handful bean thread noodles, broken into ~2 inch lengths
  • 1.5 tsp kosher salt
Instructions
  1. Heat some vegetable oil in a large saute pan over medium high heat.
  2. Add the chili garlic sauce, saute for a few seconds. Add the cabbage and saute 3 minutes.
  3. Add the salt. Saute until cabbage releases a lot of water. Add bouillon cube.
  4. Push the cabbage to the sides of the pan, there should be a lot of water in the middle. Add bean thread noodles and soak them in the water until they are soaked and start to soften, 1 min.
  5. Mix cabbage and bean thread noodles together, cover and cook over medium-low heat until cabbage is done to the degree you like.
Notes
Bean thread noodles usually come with six or eight small bundles per package. What I mean by "1 handful" is one of these small bundles. It should fit in your palm. If for some reason your cabbage does not release enough water to saturate the noodles, you can soak them in hot water for 1 min before putting them into the cabbage.

Some of you may think: This is Chinese food? It doesn’t have any soy sauce in it or anything. The thing is that the food you order in authentic Chinese restaurants (let’s not even talk about the American-Chinese sweet and sour pork type places) is not the same as Chinese food people cook in their homes. Have you ever had Tomato and Egg? Shanghai Kao-Fu? Food cooked in homes is usually just this simple. A few ingredients, throw them all into a pan, cook, done. It’s good though.